• Welcome to Anglican Apologetics for Undergraduate Students

    Course Description: Undergraduate students focus on knowledge acquisition and understanding of global themes, as well as historic and current challenges.

    Anglican Apologetics is a course designed to traverse the entire range of apologetical issues which confront layand clerical leaders of the modern, Apostolic Church. What is the overall literary integrity of the New Testament materials – the very foundation of theChurch - are they reliable? How does the Church address some of the more difficult theological, cultural and political issues of the present day? What is the argument for the existence of God, for example? Can we know him? What is the justification for the Church’s belief in the ultimate redemption of man -and of his history – in a period of unimaginable brutality, debauchery and civilizational decay? What is the explanation for a seemingly hopeless division of the physical Church of Christ, in which wickedness so often achieves the ascendency and its very unity, holiness, universality, and apostolicity seems engulfed in irresolvable crisis? Finally, what is Anglicanism’s place in the present multi-jurisdictional environment in setting forth the witness of Christ and feeding his sheep in an increasing hostile and secularized world?

  • Welcome to Apologetics for Graduate Students

    One of the fascinating truths of the modern world is that this one layman of the Anglican Church is one of the best apologists to grace us. Not a clergyman. Hmmmmm. Lewis' works have been translated into more than 30 languages and have sold millions of copies (so says Wikipedia) - what will your legacy be? Study hard and plan now.

  • Survey of the Apocrypha is an introductory course designed to increase student knowledge and appreciation of the structure, literary styles, major theological and historical themes, and personalities of the Old Testament Apocryphal literature.

  • OT Survey II acquaints the student with the period of the post-Davidic monarchy through the major and minor prophets, the subsequent decline and fall and deportation of the Northern Kingdom of Israel to Assyria and the Judean Kingdom to Babylon. Also, this course takes a brief look at the cultural and theological environment of the intertestamental period and at the composition of its Deuterocanonical writings. (This period is covered separately in BC 525, Survey of the Apocrypha.) The course concludes with a consideration of the early ministry of John the Baptist, on the eve of the New Testament era. Students will also continue to develop a basic working knowledge of Biblical Hebrew, focusing on important words and concepts as they occur in the text.

  • Course Objectives: To acquaint the student with the background, content and message each book of the Old Testament from Genesis through the Psalms, with a view toward the unity of all the books in the progress of revelation and redemption.

    Students should, upon completion of this course, be able to list the basic facts regarding each book's historical background, themes, and content; summarize the process of Old Testament canonical formation and textual transmission and critically interact with various critical theories of textual development; describe the basic features of the literary genres present in the text: legal, covenantal, historical narrative, poetical and so on; demonstrate an understanding of a typological and Christological understanding of the text and explain the major developments of Ancient Israel’s history.

    Students will also develop a basic working knowledge of Biblical Hebrew, focusing on important words and concepts as they occur in the text.


  • Welcome to BC 435: New Testament Studies I: the Synoptic Gospels

    Course Description:This course examines how the Synoptic Gospels were written, why they were written, and how they were transmitted. This course will thus attempt to unravel the “Synoptic Problem” and to stabilize the Synoptic genre. The Synoptic Problem is this: how do we resolve the undeniable, physical, literary relationship between the first three Gospels and at the same time explain why there are so many distinctive differences between them? What is the evidence for the primacy of Matthew, as the Church has always maintained until the modern era, which has seen a proliferation of so many conflicting source-critical theories? And as a corollary, this course will examine the relationship of John’s Gospel to the Synoptic template – what is the nature of this relationship - and why is John so different in form and structure from this template? Finally, having stabilized a genre and an order for the Synoptic/Johannine Gospels, what was the global literary intent of each of the authors?


  • Welcome to BC515: Old Testament Survey I: Pentateuch to David for Graduate Students

    Course Objectives: To acquaint the student with the background, content and message each book of the Old Testament from Genesis through the Psalms, with a view toward the unity of all the books in the progress of revelation and redemption.

    Students should, upon completion of this course, be able to list the basic facts regarding each book's historical background, themes, and content; summarize the process of Old Testament canonical formation and textual transmission and critically interact with various critical theories of textual development; describe the basic features of the literary genres present in the text: legal, covenantal, historical narrative, poetical and so on; demonstrate an understanding of a typological and Christological understanding of the text and explain the major developments of Ancient Israel’s history.

    Students will also develop a basic working knowledge of Biblical Hebrew, focusing on important words and concepts as they occur in the text.

  • BC635: New Testament Studies I: The Synoptic Gospels

    Course Description

    This course examines how the Synoptic Gospels were written, why they were written, and how they were transmitted. This coursewill thus attempt to unravel the “Synoptic Problem” and to stabilize the Synoptic genre. The Synoptic Problem is this: how do we resolve the undeniable, physical, literary relationship between the first three Gospels and at the sametime explain why there are so many distinctive differences between them? What is the evidence for the primacy of Matthew, as the Church has always maintained until the modern era, which has seen a proliferation of so many conflicting source-critical theories? And as a corollary, this course will examine the relationship of John’s Gospel to the Synoptic template – what is the nature of this relationship - and why is John so different in form and structure from this template? Finally, having stabilized a genre and an order for the Synoptic/Johannine Gospels, what was the global literary intent of each of the authors?

  • Welcome to CH 302: Church History: Clement to Reformation for Undergraduates

    Course Objectives:To acquaint the student with the major theological, intellectual, institutional, and spiritual developments of Medieval Church history; to recognize the historical, cultural, and political factors that influenced the development of Christian thought and practice during the Medieval period; to critically appraise the thought and work of the leading thinkers of the period; and to understand how theological and ecclesiastical developments of the period laid the foundation for the movements that led to the Reformation.

  • Course Objectives: To acquaint the student with the major theological, intellectual, institutional, and spiritual developments of Medieval Church history; to recognize the historical, cultural, and political factors that influenced the development of Christian thought and practice during the Medieval period; to critically appraise the thought and work of the leading thinkers of the period; and to understand how theological and ecclesiastical developments of the period laid the foundation for the movements that led to the Reformation.
  • This course will equip students with some proper attitudes, techniques, learning strategies, and resources to make study at St. Andrew's Theological College and Seminary successful.

    Students will become familiar with:

    • Navigation of the S.A.I.L. portal
    • The Academic Honor Policy
    • The required standards for turning in written assignments
    • Citation and writing resources

    This course is required of all new SAIL students via the online platform. All students under previous catalogs who do not take courses online will not be required to take the online IC100. These students have their own correspondence course meeting the needs of their technology limitations.

  • Course Objective: This 3 hour course is part of a 6 hour sequence that provides an extended opportunity to develop a spiritual discipline, to define and to explore various modes of Christian spirituality, to engage in a comprehensive Biblical conversation about New Testament spirituality, to examine the existential modes of spirituality as they are expressed in tangible lives that we must live - within nature, marriage, family, community, nation , church and vocation.
  • Course Objective: This 3 hour course will provide students an introduction to spirituality, or faith building, as they explore various scholars' works and the issues that face Christians in today's world.
  • After completing this course, the student will have a knowledge and understanding of the sacraments of baptism and confirmation from an historical, theological, and practical view point, and should be able adequately to explain the theology, rites, and ceremony to candidates for baptism and confirmation.
  • Course Objectives: On completion of this course, the student will have a knowledge and understanding of Holy Orders as that office and sacrament is understood from Scriptural, historic and theological vantage points, thereby gaining a deeper and more personal insight into his own vocational calling and the structure of the threefold ministry in which he is seeking to be ordained.
  • Welcome to TH335: New Testament Survey for Undergraduate Students

    Course Description: The New Testament Survey course is abroad brush stroke look at the entire range of New Testament material; its formation, its very nature. What is the Apostolic conversation contained in these twenty seven pieces of religious literature that the Church has traditionally received as canon? This course is designed to acquaint the Christian educator, pastor or leader with the full range of critical, literary, apologetical and spiritual issues concerning the New Testament which impacts the teaching and proclaiming of the Apostolic gospel in the 21stCentury.

  • Welcome to TH460: Systematic Theology for Undergraduate Students

    Course Description: Systematic Theology is a course which surveys some of the most influential, prolific and sometimes controversial systematic theologians since the time of Augustine. Some stand squarely in the stream of Apostolic Orthodoxy. Some near the very edge. Regrettably, some stand outside the stream, yet not always, and in everything. This course helps to develop the critical thinking skills which define the difference between systematic theology and Biblical theology and to suggest ways in which the study of systematic theologians and their theologies can be helpful in the ministries of the parish priest, the Christian educator, and the lay leader.

  • Course Objectives: On completion of this course, the student will have a knowledge and understanding of Holy Orders as that office and sacrament is understood from Scriptural, historic and theological vantage points, thereby gaining a deeper and more personal insight into his own vocational calling and the structure of the threefold ministry in which he is seeking to be ordained.

  • Welcome to TH460: Systematic Theology for Undergraduate Students

    Course Description: Systematic Theology is a course which surveys some of the most influential, prolific and sometimes controversial systematic theologians since the time of Augustine. Some stand squarely in the stream of Apostolic Orthodoxy. Some near the very edge. Regrettably, some stand outside the stream, yet not always, and in everything. This course helps to develop the critical thinking skills which define the difference between systematic theology and Biblical theology and to suggest ways in which the study of systematic theologians and their theologies can be helpful in the ministries of the parish priest, the Christian educator, and the lay leader.